Atomic Structure and Chemical Bonding I

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Atomic Structure and Chemical Bonding I

A chemical bond is a permanent attraction between atoms, ions, or molecules that allows chemical compounds to be formed. Ionic bonds form when oppositely charged ions attract one other electrostatically, while covalent bonds form when electrons are shared. Chemical bonds come in a variety of strengths; there are “strong bonds” or “primary bonds” like covalent, ionic, and metallic connections, as well as “weak bonds” or “secondary bonds” like dipole-dipole interactions, the London dispersion force, and hydrogen bonding.

The negatively charged electrons orbiting the nucleus are attracted to each other by a simple electromagnetic force. Positively charged protons in the nucleus are attracted to one another. An electron positioned between two nuclei will be attracted to both of them, while nuclei in this location will be attracted to electrons.

The chemical connection is formed by this attraction. Because of the matter-wave nature of electrons and their lesser mass, they must occupy a far bigger volume than nuclei.n comparison to the size of the nuclei themselves, the volume occupied by electrons maintains the atomic nuclei in a bond relatively far apart. Strong chemical bonding is generally connected with the sharing or transfer of electrons between the atoms involved. The positively charged protons in the nucleus bind together.

An electron sandwiched between two nuclei will be attracted to both of them, and nuclei will be attracted to electrons sandwiched between them. The chemical bond is created by this attraction. Electrons must occupy a significantly larger volume than nuclei due to their matter wave nature and smaller mass. Simplification rules, on the other hand, allow chemists to forecast the strength, directionality, and polarity of bonds in practice. Two examples are the octet rule and the VSEPR theory. Valence bond theory, which includes orbital hybridization and resonance, and molecular orbital theory, which includes a linear combination of atomic orbitals and ligand field theory, are more complex theories. Bond polarities and their effects on chemical compounds are described using electrostatics.

 

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Course Content

Lecture 1: Welcome

  • Lecture 2: Elementary Mathematical Functions Used in Our Course
    00:00
  • Lecture 3: Schrodinger Equation: Particle in a One Dimensional Box
    00:00
  • Lecture 4: Particle in a One dimensional Box: Probabilities and Expectation Values
    00:00
  • Lecture 5: Elementary Mathematics: Introduction to Matrix Algebra – Part 2
    00:00
  • Lecture 5: Elementary Mathematics: Introduction to Matrix Algebra – Part 1
    00:00
  • Lecture 6: Elementary Mathematics: Matrix Eigenvalues and Eigenfunctions – Part I
    00:00
  • Lecture 7: Elementary Mathematics: Matrix Eigenvalues and Eigenfunctions – Part II
    00:00
  • Lecture 8: Particle in a Two Dimensional Box (Infinite Barrier)
    00:00
  • Lecture 9: Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle
    00:00
  • Lecture 10: Expectation Values and Postulates in Quantum Mechanics
    00:00
  • Lecture 11: Problems and Solutions for Particle in One and Two Dimensional Boxes
    00:00
  • Lecture 12: Linear Vector Spaces: Matrix Representations
    00:00
  • Lecture 13: Linear Vector Spaces and Operators: Dirac’s Bracket Notation
    00:00
  • Lecture 14: Simple Harmonic Oscillator: Classical Hamiltonian
    00:00
  • Lecture 15: Simple Harmonic Oscillator: Quantum Mechanical Solutions
    00:00
  • Lecture 16: Simple Harmonic Oscillator: Wave Functions, Probabilities and Average Values
    00:00
  • Lecture 17: Simple Harmonic Oscillator: Average Values for Position and Momentum
    00:00
  • Lecture 18: Particle on a Ring: The Quantum Model
    00:00
  • Lecture 19: Particle on a Ring: Expectation Values for Angular Momentum
    00:00
  • Lecture 20: Coordinate Transformation
    00:00
  • Lecture 21: Problems and Solutions for Harmonic Oscillator
    00:00
  • Lecture 22 – Hydrogen Atom: The Hamiltonian in Spherical Polar Coordinates
    00:00
  • Lecture 23 – Hydrogen Atom: Separation of the Schrödinger Equation
    00:00
  • Lecture 24 – Hydrogen Atom: Radial and Angular Solutions and Animations Part I
    00:00
  • Lecture 25 – Hydrogen Atom: Radial and Angular Solutions and Animations Part II
    00:00
  • Lecture 26 – Hydrogen Atom: Radial Solutions and Probabilities
    00:00
  • Lecture 27 – Power Series Method for Differential Equation – I
    00:00
  • Lecture 28 – Hermite’s Differential Equation
    00:00

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