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Atomic Structure and Chemical Bonding II

  • Course level: Beginner
  • Categories C-Science
  • Last Update 17/07/2021

Description

Atomic Structure and Chemical Bonding II

A chemical bond is a permanent attraction between atoms, ions, or molecules that allows chemical compounds to be formed. Ionic bonds form when oppositely charged ions attract one other electrostatically, while covalent bonds form when electrons are shared. Chemical bonds come in a variety of strengths; there are “strong bonds” or “primary bonds” like covalent, ionic, and metallic connections, as well as “weak bonds” or “secondary bonds” like dipole-dipole interactions, the London dispersion force, and hydrogen bonding.

The negatively charged electrons orbiting the nucleus are attracted to each other by a simple electromagnetic force. Positively charged protons in the nucleus are attracted to one another. An electron positioned between two nuclei will be attracted to both of them, while nuclei in this location will be attracted to electrons.

The chemical connection is formed by this attraction. Because of the matter-wave nature of electrons and their lesser mass, they must occupy a far bigger volume than nuclei.n comparison to the size of the nuclei themselves, the volume occupied by electrons maintains the atomic nuclei in a bond relatively far apart. Strong chemical bonding is generally connected with the sharing or transfer of electrons between the atoms involved. The positively charged protons in the nucleus bind together.

An electron sandwiched between two nuclei will be attracted to both of them, and nuclei will be attracted to electrons sandwiched between them. The chemical bond is created by this attraction. Electrons must occupy a significantly larger volume than nuclei due to their matter wave nature and smaller mass. Simplification rules, on the other hand, allow chemists to forecast the strength, directionality, and polarity of bonds in practice. Two examples are the octet rule and the VSEPR theory. Valence bond theory, which includes orbital hybridization and resonance, and molecular orbital theory, which includes a linear combination of atomic orbitals and ligand field theory, are more complex theories. Bond polarities and their effects on chemical compounds are described using electrostatics.

 

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Topics for this course

25 Lessons

Lecture 29 – Legendre and Associated Legendre Equation

Lecture 30 – Born-Oppenheimer Approximation00:00:00
Lecture 31 – Introduction to Angular Momentum00:00:00
Lecture 32 – Spin ½ Angular Momentum00:00:00
Lecture 33 – Spin Angular Momentum and Coupling of Two Spin-1/2 Angular Momenta00:00:00
Lecture 34 – Coupling of Two Angular Momenta00:00:00
Lecture 35 – Video Tutorial for Hermite polynomials and hydrogen atom – Part 100:00:00
Lecture 36 – Video Tutorials Part 200:00:00
Lecture 37 – Variational Principle in Quantum Chemistry: Linear superposition Principle00:00:00
Lecture 38 – Introduction to Variational Principle in Quantum Chemistry00:00:00
Lecture 39 – Variational Method: Method of Lagrange Multipliers00:00:00
Lecture 40 – Hydrogen Molecule Ion: The Molecular Orbital Method00:00:00
Lecture 41 – Hydrogen Molecule Ion: Calculations and Results00:00:00
Lecture 42 – Hydrogen Molecule: The Valence Bond Method00:00:00
Lecture 43- Hydrogen Molecule: Calculations and Molecular Orbital Method00:00:00
Lecture 44 – Video Tutorials on Angular Momentum (Orbital and Spin) and Variational Method Part 100:00:00
Lecture 45 – Video Tutorials on Angular Momentum (Orbital and Spin) and Variational Method Part 200:00:00
Lecture 46 – Introduction to Quantum Mechanical Perturbation Theory00:00:00
Lecture 47 – First Order Time Independent perturbation Theory for Non-Degenerate states00:00:00
Lecture 48 – First and Second Order Time Independent Perturbation Theory for Non-Degenerate States00:00:00
Lecture 49: First and Second Order Time Independent Perturbation Theory: Simple Examples00:00:00
Lecture 50: Time Independent Perturbation Theory for Degenerate States: First Order00:00:00
Lecture 51: General MO method for Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules00:00:00
Lecture 52: Surface drainage system design-200:00:00
Lecture 53: Introduction to Hybridization and Valence Bond for Polyatomic Molecules00:00:00
Lecture 54: HÜckel Molecular Orbital Theory II00:00:00
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Enrolment validity: Lifetime